More background on Egypt

The violence continues in Cairo.  I just heard on NPR that five were killed and 800 wounded in violence yesterday (Wednesday).  Here’s the front page of today’s New York Times, as of about 6:45 Thursday morning:


As you can read above, Yemen, Jordan, Syria and Saudi Arabia all have similar dynamics — people who have had enough and want a reformed government that is more responsive to their needs.  Thanks to Google Earth for helping show where those places are located, relative to Egypt.

Below are some sources I’ve found useful in figuring out what’s going on:

The New York Times has a great interactive timeline of Mubarak’s 30 years in power.

Here are a few details I learned from the timeline.  Mubarak came to power when President Anwar El Sadat was assassinated in 1981.  Here’s a picture that shows the army troops running up to the parade review stand where Sadat and Mubarak were standing:

Here’s a 3-minute video showing footage from the assassination in 1981.  It’s amazing what’s available online these days.

Also from the NYT timeline, here’s a picture from a protest in 2005, opposing the “election” of Mubarak to a fifth six-year term.  Apparently, by that time, many Egyptians had had enough of Mubarak, and so they formed a political party called Kefaya, which means “enough” in Egyptian. 

Despite their protests, Mubarak was elected by a clear margin:


Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elections_in_Egypt
Also, here’s a good 4-minute video summary of the Egyptian crisis that one of my students (thanks Lauren!) found online.  As of 6:45 a.m. Thursday, it had nearly 120,000 views on YouTube.

And in the four hours since then (it’s now 10:24 a.m.), it has had 10,000+ more views:

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About Steve Goldberg

I teach students at Research Triangle High School (RTHS) about US History. RTHS is a public charter school in Durham, NC, whose mission is to incubate, prove and scale innovative models of teaching and learning. The blog posts here reflect my own personal views and not those of my employer.
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